In-Text Advertising

It looks like In-Text Advertising has finally found New Zealand portals.

I’ve noticed over the last month a few portals of note (e.g. geekzone.co.nz) have been running the adverts. So far it looks like the sites are completing trial runs but it will be interesting to see if the trend catches on.

In-Text Advertising is where a script is loaded on a web page and as the page is generated, any keywords in the main body of text that match advertising keywords appear with a special underline or highlight. Usually when you roll over the text there’s a pop-up which shows relevant advertising that you can click on.

Generally if you work in the online industry you’ll spot these pretty quickly as they look quite different within a block of text (that’s part of the idea) and are often shown with a double underline which is supposed to highlight that they are an advertisement.

I’ve played around with In-Text Advertising in the past and have to say the click rates can be quite high however it is usual that the CPC (cost-per-click) values offered are significantly lower than a CPC value through a standard advertising program such as Google Adsense.

The closest thing to In-Text Advertising that Google has is the Google Link Unit format which displays a set of links with basic keywords related to the content on the page. While not exactly “In-Text” there are many people who use the Link Units in ways that make them look considerably like text links within a page. It’s interesting to note that Google have it in their terms and conditions of Adsense that the links should not look like navigation on the site.

Generally the biggest issue with In-Text Advertising is the impact on usability for the average reader. Not only is the average user not expecting a pop-up when they go to click a link on the page, I have seen it time and time again when a user is just rolling their mouse across a page with these advertisements in it and the pop-up’s come up and go away completely distracting and confusing the user.

Whatever your take is on In-Text Advertising, it’s here to stay in some format or other and if any of the current programs can gain some form of critical advertiser mass (or Google Adsense decide to launch it) then CPC values are likely to go up and we’ll all be using it as the default form of advertising.

At least it beats the good old 468×60!

If you’re looking to trial the advertising check out the following;

  • Kontera ContentLink (http://www.kontera.com) – has excellent administration and reporting system. Good sign-up, clear and concise tax and payee information area and simple implementation with standard script dropped into page as well as download plugins available for the major CMS / Blogging platforms (Blogger, WordPress, Joomla & Drupal).
  • infolinks (http://www.infolinks.com) – there was a long delay (couple of days) in acceptance to the program and the reporting is no-where near as sophisticated as Kontera ContentLink but the implementation (which they call “1 minute implementation) looks quite simple.

If you have feedback on In-Text Advertising yourself within the New Zealand market drop me a note and let me know what your experiences were.

5 thoughts on “In-Text Advertising

  1. I wonder how good the in text advertising system has been working? I personally become very annoyed by them, but thats just me.

  2. I’ve been trialling In-Text advertising on a casual games affiliate site and it’s yielding reasonable results however I agree on both counts above.

    It’s not the best usability (I know I find it annoying) and the results don’t yield quite what a PPC advert would.

    There is a place for it though, especially if it can be used at a low level where it doesn’t interfere with other advertising.

    Neil, hopefully you build one that doesn’t place too many in-text ads on any single page! 🙂

  3. I think that In-text Advertising is pretty good on internet. Because Search engine can easily find the page by searching keywords!

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